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A Mini Theory

No Haggling For A Bargain

rain 31 °C

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As poverty is rampant in Nepal, many rural folks in Nepal live under 1 Dollar (RM4) a day. They live in extreme poverty. In the free-market society, capitalism leads to economic and social inequality. Many people, particularly the village folks are left out in the competition of the free-market capitalism.

I have a mini theory settling in my mind. There are ways while we travel in Nepal, we can help to bring the livelihood of the poor village folks to a higher initiative by giving them a security of support.

One of the ways we can offer help is, we make attempts to spend more money down right into the hands of the village folks in the Himalayas.

Another way is, we have to avoid haggle for any bargain with the village folks. This is a foremost rule. Bargain with the village folks is a no-no deal.

There is a limit one person can do to help improve the plight of poverty of the people in Nepal. I am only a white-collar worker and I am not a person earning a salary that flushes my pocket with cash notes. However, If I spend for my food, say a meal for RM10, or paying for my shelter, say a room for RM20, all charging by the village folks - I should not ask for a bargain. I must remember this rule when I travel.

Because the prices of food and services in Nepal are always not rated, habitually it creates a room for many people to bargain. However, I will try to avoid to haggle a bargain with the village folks. I have to accept and pay the bills as long as the prices are still kept reasonable and I am afforded to pay for it.

A dollar or two do not bloat my money pouch, but they do carry a significant weight to these village folks for them to make a living.
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PrtS9bkXTGQ&list=RDGq4Ti4WQICA&index=8
Parkhi Base Aula Vani - by Narayan Gopal
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Posted by Quah Khian Hu 06:50 Archived in Malaysia

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